Parylene Coating Blog by Diamond-MT

How Fast Does Parylene Deposit?

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Nov 20, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

Parylene conformal coatings combine a number of properties that are attractive for use in a wide spectrum of applications. Their low dielectric properties, high mechanical strength, transparency, bio compatibility, chemical inertness against all of the common acids, bases and organic solvents, low water/gas permeability and thermal properties make them interesting for use in many industries. Also, pinhole-free Parylene conformal coatings with a thickness higher than 0.1 μm are possible and have been reported earlier [1]. Therefore, understanding their deposition process and characteristics is important.

Read More

Tags: parylene coating process, parylene process, parylene deposition

Can Parylene be Layered?

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Oct 02, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

Multilayer conformal coatings are advantageous in resolving diffusion or stability issues. A vast amount of knowledge is available in the literature about the use of multilayered stacks of Parylene and stacks making use of different intermediate materials such as metals and so on. Mostly, use of Multiple layers of Parylene C was commonly reported for Medical Implants [1].

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene coating process, parylene process, parylene deposition

What Temperature is Parylene Applied At?

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Aug 03, 2018 @ 07:30 AM

Parylene (XY) conformal coatings are applied to substrate materials through a specialized chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process that completely eliminates the liquid phase of wet coatings.  No initiators or catalysts are involved in CVD polymerization, which synthesizes truly conformal protective film in-process.  This is in stark contrast to wet coating materials such as acrylic, epoxy, silicone and urethane, which are synthesized prior to application via, brush, dip or spray methods.  Wet during application, liquid-coated substrates requiring further drying and curing.

Read More

Tags: parylene coating process, parylene process, parylene deposition

Paralene, Paralyne, or Parylene: Correctly Spelling and Using This Superior Conformal Coating

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Dec 01, 2017 @ 08:01 AM

Accidentally discovered in 1947, by chemist Michael Szwarc, the polymer parylene originally bore his name, and was known for a brief period known as Szwarcite. Working to thermally decompose the solvent p-xylene at temperatures exceeding 1000 °C, Szwarc identified the monomer para-xylylene di-iodide as the only product resulting when para-xylylene was reacted with iodine.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition, parylene C

Where to Buy Parylene

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Jul 28, 2017 @ 07:38 AM

Materially, parylene is the most distinctive of the major conformal coatings.  But just how does it differ from liquid coatings -- acrylic, epoxy, silicone and urethane??  

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene deposition, parylene dimer

Batch Size Considerations for Parylene Production

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Apr 14, 2017 @ 07:35 AM

The parylenes consist of a range of para-xylylene polymers whose desirable physical and electrical properties support expansive utilization as conformal coatings for electronic and medical devices  Parylene films are applied to substrates via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process, which deposits monomeric parylene vapor homogeneously and deeply into the surface of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and related assemblies/components. 

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition, parylene disadvantages

Is Parylene Safe?

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Aug 12, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

Application of parylene’s xylylene monomer employs a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process implemented under a vacuum.  Unlike wet coating application methods – brushing, dipping, spraying, etc. – parylene CVD is not line-of-sight.  Because the vaporous monomer envelopes all sides of the assembly being coated, appropriate process control allows vacuum deposition of an entirely conformal coating, one that penetrates deep into any crevices, rivulets, or sharp edges and points that exist on the assembly’s surface.  The resultant parylene film is insulating, ultra-thin, and pinhole-free, exhibiting superior protective barrier qualities and very low moisture permeability.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene deposition, parylene uniformity, medical parylene, medical device coating, parylene safety

Mastering the Parylene Coating Process

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Sep 04, 2015 @ 08:00 AM

Parylene Deposition  

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition

How Parylene is Applied Compared to Other Conformal Coatings

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Aug 21, 2015 @ 01:45 PM

Overall the generic name parylene describes a distinct collection of polycrystalline and linear organic coating materials with innumerable applications.  The essential basis of today's parylene N, p-xylene, was inadvertently synthesized at England's University of Manchester in 1947The filmy residue resulted after high-temperature heating of compounds of toulene and the xylenes polymerized into para-xylene.  The substance immediately demonstrated an exceptional capacity for generating the fine but resilient surface-covering that characterizes today's range of parylene conformal coatings.  

Read More

Tags: acrylic conformal coating, parylene, parylene deposition

Silicone Conformal Coating vs Parylene

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Aug 07, 2015 @ 09:46 AM

Silicone and Parylene conformal coatings are a lot like humans and dogs. At first glance, we are very different from our canine friends. However, we have a lot in common -- noses, two eyes, hearts, dreams. In fact, we share 84 percent of our DNA with Rover (or Spot). So too with the two coatings. While both have some functional differences -- which we'll explore here -- they also have an important similarity. Parylene and Silicone are both some of the best choices for conformal coatings of your company's products.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene deposition, silicone conformal coating

Understanding Parylene Deposition

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Jul 31, 2015 @ 08:10 AM

Parylene's deposition process is unique among conformal coatings. Unlike others that start as a liquid, get deposited and dry, it starts as a solid. Parylene coating equipment turns it into a vapor, where it then deposits onto the substrate. This unique four-step method poses some challenges but also brings real advantages.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene deposition, parylene disadvantages

Masking for Parylene Deposition

Posted by Sean Horn on Fri, Jul 17, 2015 @ 07:15 AM

Masking and Parylene Deposition

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene deposition, parylene masking

Parylene Masking Revealed

Posted by Sean Horn on Wed, Aug 14, 2013 @ 09:07 AM

Whether the application is a medical device, a printed circuit board (PCB), or a light-emitting diode (LED), a parylene conformal coating is typically applied to protect the product. Sometimes, however, the product actually has to be protected from the parylene conformal coating—or at least parts of it do. 

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene conformal coating, parylene process, parylene deposition, parylene masking

What is the maximum object size for parylene coating?

Posted by Sean Horn on Mon, Feb 11, 2013 @ 11:00 AM

People often wonder if their project can be parylene coated.  While there are huge list of items that can be coated with parylene, there are some limitations.  One of these limitations is size.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene conformal coating, parylene coating process, parylene deposition

What is type XY conformal coating?

Posted by Sean Horn on Wed, Jan 09, 2013 @ 12:04 PM

Type xy conformal coating refers to parylene conformal coating.  Parylene gets the type xy from its’ full name, para-xylylene.   It was shortened to parylene and eventually type xy so that it could be grouped with the other conformal coatings (type ar, ur, etc.).

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene conformal coating, parylene deposition, conformal coating thickness, type xy

Parylene and MEMS Technology

Posted by Sean Horn on Mon, Jun 18, 2012 @ 07:52 AM

In the past decade, the use of Parylene as a structural material in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices has attracted significant attention.  Parylene C, known for its biocompatibility, is widely used in implantable medical devices.  Parylene C is also compatible with MEMS microfabrication processes.

WHAT ARE MEMS?

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is the technology of very small devices; it merges at the nano-scale into nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and nanotechnology.  MEMS are made up of components between 1 to 100 micrometres in size (i.e. 0.001 to 0.1 mm), and MEMS devices generally range in size from 20 micrometres (20 millionths of a metre) to a millimetre (i.e. 0.02 to 1.0 mm). They usually consist of a central unit that processes data (the microprocessor) and several components that interact with the outside such as microsensors.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene conformal coating, parylene deposition, conformal coating thickness, parylene thickness, parylene C, Parylene and MEMS, MEMS

How Parylene Cost is Determined

Posted by Sean Horn on Mon, Apr 16, 2012 @ 03:34 PM

Parylene is often priced out to be one of the more expensive conformal coating options.  After a quick look at some of the cost factors, it will be easy to see why.  Three of the main factors that influence parylene cost are raw materials, labor, and lot volume. 

 Raw Materials – Parylene Dimer and Adhesion Promotion

 Parylene dimer is the raw form of parylene.  It is the solid inserted into the machine that is broken down through the deposition process.  Cost for parylene dimer can be anywhere from $200 to $5,000 per pound depending on the different type of dimer.  A typical coating run is around a pound of dimer.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene cost, parylene process, parylene deposition, parylene dimer, conformal coating process, conformal coating methods, conformal coating service, parylene adhesion, parylene coating service, conformal coating costs

All about the Parylene Coating Process

Posted by Sean Horn on Tue, Apr 03, 2012 @ 11:21 AM

Parylene Coating Process – Phase 1 – Prior to Parts Arrival

 Once we receive a purchase order from a customer, all of the pertinent information such as drawings, specifications, and special instructions are given to the quality department from our marketing team to create custom work instructions for that particular part. 

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition, Diamond-MT, conformal coating, parylene adhesion, parylene coating service

How to Improve Parylene Adhesion

Posted by Sean Horn on Wed, Mar 28, 2012 @ 02:28 PM

How to Improve Parylene Adhesion

 Parylene, through its deposition process, does not adhere chemically, only mechanically, to any given substrate.  In order to improve parylene adhesion to its best possible levels for a wide variety of substrates, different methods of surface modification via adhesion promoters must be used.  Adhesion promotion methods are typically used prior to the actual coating process, however some can be integrated during the process itself.

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition, conformal coating, parylene adhesion

The Parylene Deposition Process

Posted by Sean Horn on Thu, Mar 22, 2012 @ 09:00 AM

The Parylene Deposition Process

 Parylene coating is applied through a vapor deposition process onto the substrate or material that is being coated.  Depending on the coating type and required thickness, typical parylene deposition rates are about .2/mils per hour, so machine runs can vary from as little as 1 hour to over 24 hours.  The process begins with raw dimer in solid state (these are:  Parylene C, Parylene N, Parylene D, Parylene AF-4, or other variants) being placed into a loading boat, which is then inserted into the vaporizer.  The raw dimer is heated between 100-150º C.  At this time, the vapor is pulled, under vacuum into the furnace and heated to very high temperatures which allows for sublimation and the splitting of the molecule into a monomer.   The monomer gas continues to be drawn by vacuum one molecule at a time onto the desired substrate at ambient temperatures in the coating chamber.  The final stage of the parylene deposition process is the cold trap.  The cold trap is cooled to between -90º and -120º C and is responsible for removing all residual parylene materials pulled through the coating chamber.       

Read More

Tags: parylene, parylene process, parylene deposition, parylene dimer